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Millefleurs Qum : 12'4" x 9'

Millefleurs Qum : 12'4" x 9'

Millefleurs Qum : 12'4" x 9'
Millefleurs Qum : 12'4" x 9'
Millefleurs Qum : 12'4" x 9'

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NameMillefleurs Qum
Size in feet 12'4" x 9'
Size in meters3.79 x 2.72
Pile (Fiber & Yarns Used)80% Silk, 20% Wool
Type of fabricationHand-knotted with Persian knots (Senneh)
Country Made InPakistan (South Asia)
Design OriginPersian
ConditionExcellent (Brand New)
Carpet ID222646
CUSTOM SIZES AVAILABLE BY SPECIAL ORDER
PLEASE CONTACT US FOR AVAILABILITY
Sizes Are Approximate. Photos Are Representative And Not Necessarily Exact For Color
New Rugs Are Of The Highest Quality In Its Category And Are Handpicked Overseas By The Bashir Family

A Brief History of Qum Carpets

Qum rugs, also known as Ghoum, Gom, Qom, Qoum, Kum or Koum, are woven in workshops of Qom, a city located in northwest central Iran. Since rug production did not begin in Qom until the 1930s, Qom doesn't have any traditional designs of its own. Qom weavers prefer to weave the most favorable designs of other Persian weaving groups and sometimes Caucasian weaving groups and adjusting these designs to their own taste. It is possible for Qom rugs to be mistaken with Kashan or Esfahan rugs. However, they will not be mistaken with Tabriz rugs because Qum, Kashan and Esfahan rugs are woven with the asymmetric (Persian) knot and Tabriz rugs are woven with the symmetric (Turkish) knot. All silk, part silk/part wool, and kork (fine wool taken from the belly of sheep) Qom rugs are very well-known in Iran and abroad. The foundation of Qum rugs could be either cotton or silk. Most Qum rugs have curvilinear patterns, and very elaborate floral motifs with intricate leaves and vines. As mentioned above the designs are varied, taken from different weaving groups. Some designs used in Qum rugs consist of vase, moharramaat, mir-i-boteh, zell-i sultan, panelled garden, hunting, tree-of-life, pictorial, Shah Abbassi melallion-and-corner with usually a circular medallion, all-over Shah Abbasi, medallion with open field, medallions resembling the famous Esfahan Sheikh Lotfollah medallion, prayer and all-over gul farangi (roses). The gul farangi motif seems to be a popular motif also used in vase, tree-of-life, and zell-i sultan designs. A panelled design containing very different motifs in each compartment is also common; the motifs inside the compartments can consist of pictorials, vases, hunting scenes, and botehs all in one rug. The colors used in Qum rugs are as diverse as the designs. The overall appearance could either be pale with background and border colors such as ivory, champagne, turquoise and light green, or it could be dark with background colors such as dark blue and even sometimes red. Red, blue and green are also used as motif colors. Other commonly used colors in Qum rugs are mushroom, rose, gold, yellow ocher and orange orcher.



A Brief History of Millefleurs Carpets

Mille-fleurs (in French), known in English as millefleur or mille-fleur literally means "thousand flowers" and refers to a background made of many small flowers and plants. It was an especially popular motif in tapestry and other applied arts and crafts during the Middle Ages in Europe. The term is also used to describe Oriental rugs with a similar design, originally Persian but later produced in much of the Middle East and Mughal India. The medieval European style may have been influenced by Persian miniatures or carpets. The Mughal emperors Shah Jahan (1627-1658) and Shah Aurangzeb (1658-1707) had a great appreciation for this particular style and they commissioned their weavers to replicate these fine delicate motifs in the carpets that adorned their palaces throughout India. In 1730 the Persian Shah Nadir Quli (1688-1747) conquered parts of India and returned home with countless treasures, including textiles and Millefleurs carpets that made a great impact on the decorative arts of Persia and the surrounding territories. A “millefleurs” carpet has a bottom which is livened up of a motive of latticework; every containing alveolus is a flower, of a big realism, is a palmette. Certain specialists see an Italian origin in this decor, also present in the Indian architectural decoration of the XVIIth century, and XVIIIth centuries, as besides on the whole decorative arts, notably, on rooms in nephrite set by precious stones. Several carpets adorned with these compositions are endowed with a line of a multicoloured silk chain, a characteristic of weavers from Lahore, Pakistan.





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