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Kondoz - Tree of Life : 12'2" x 8'7"

Kondoz - Tree of Life : 12'2" x 8'7"

Kondoz - Tree of Life : 12'2" x 8'7"
Kondoz - Tree of Life : 12'2" x 8'7"
Kondoz - Tree of Life : 12'2" x 8'7"

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NameKondoz - Tree of Life
Size in feet 12'2" x 8'7"
Size in meters3.71 x 2.62
Pile (Fiber & Yarns Used)100% Pure Lamb's Wool, All Natural Vegetable Dyes
Type of fabricationHand-knotted with Persian knots (Senneh)
Country Made InAfghanistan (South-Central Asia)
Design OriginPersian
ConditionExcellent (Brand New)
Carpet IDK0512
CUSTOM SIZES AVAILABLE BY SPECIAL ORDER
PLEASE CONTACT US FOR AVAILABILITY
Sizes are approximate. Photographs are not necessarily exact for color.
New rugs are of the highest quality in their category and are handpicked overseas by the Bashir family.

A Brief History of Afghan Carpets

Afghan carpets usually refer to rugs traditionally made in Afghanistan. However, many of these carpets today are also woven by Afghan refugees who reside in Pakistan and Iran. Between 1979 and 1992, at least a million Afghans, including hundreds of thousands of rug-weavers, fled Afghanistan during its war with the Soviet Union and subsequent civil war, settling especially in Pakistan and Iran. Afghan rugs are solid, durable and often charming. They reflect the heritage of cottage-based craftsmanship passed through generations of families. Carpets from Afghanistan can be divided into two branches: Turkmen carpets (also known as Turkoman) and Baluchi carpets. Most of these carpets have more in common with the tribal weavings of Central Asia in terms of color, design, and weave than with their sophisticated Persian counterparts. Most Afghan weavers make rugs that are about the same as those they have woven for decades. Their carpets are often woven on small portable looms and are mainly produced to adorn the tents they live in. Most are made up of Persian knots and many feature vegetable-dyed hand spun Afghan wool. Natural dyes are still used, but since the 1950s pre-dyed wool yarn readily found in the towns and villages are often substituted for or combined with the natural dyes. Various qualities of pile carpets are available, ranging from coarse to medium in weave, including felted wool carpets (namads), flat non-pile fabric woven carpets (kilims), and pile and knotted carpets made from wool, silk, and cotton. As a testament to the meticulous nature of the art, one large Afghan carpet typically takes six to nine months to weave.



A Brief History of Tree of Life Carpets

The concept of a tree of life as a many-branched tree illustrating the idea that all life on earth is related has been used in science, religion, philosophy, mythology, and other fields including the art of carpet weaving for centuries. There has always been a great classical tradition of carpets depicting the Tree of Life. Since ancient times, this symbol in oriental carpets has represented the direct path from earth to heaven. It distinguishes itself from other carpet patterns in that it is based on one of the oldest and most universal of all religious and mythological symbols in human history. Reference to a “Tree of Life” as the connecting link between the human and heavenly worlds are found in ancient cultures spanning throughout Europe, Asia Minor and the Orient. 

In fact, trees have always been important symbols in the religion of Jews, Christians, and Muslims. The Tree of Life is a mystical symbol used in the Kabbalah of esoteric Judaism to describe the path to God and the manner in which he created the world out of nothing. Kabbalists believe it to be a diagrammatic representation of the process by which the Universe came into being. It symbolises that point beyond which our comprehension of the origins of being cannot go. Kabbalists do not envision time and space as pre-existing, and place them at the next three stages on the Tree of Life. The Tree of Life in the Book of Genesis is a tree planted by God in midst of the Garden of Eden, whose fruit gives everlasting life, i.e. immortality. Together with the Tree of Life, God planted the tree of the knowledge of good and evil (Genesis 2:9). In Islam, the Tree of Life symbolizes the bridge between Paradise, the world of men and the world below. It is usually used in conjunction with a garden, vase or prayer rug design. In Baha'i Faith, it can refer to the Manifestation of God, a great teacher who appears to humanity from age to age. The concept can be broken down still further, with the Manifestation as the roots and trunk of the tree and his followers as the branches and leaves. The fruit produced by the tree nourishes an ever-advancing civilization. A distinction has been made between the Tree of Life and the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. The latter represents the physical world with its opposites, such as good and evil and light and dark. In a different context from the one above, the Tree of Life represents the spiritual realm, where this duality does not exist. This symbol is also found in the Norse saga of the ash tree Yggdrasil, where the tree provides a magical spring water of knowledge. There is a similar mythology in China, where a carving of a Tree of Life depicts a bird and a dragon- in Chinese mythology, the dragon often represents immortality.

Several workshop groups in Persia, Anatolia, India and Pakistan produce extremely intricate and naturalistic interpretations of the Tree of Life scheme. More stylized and geometric versions are found on a number of village and nomadic rugs from Persia, Anatolia and Afghanistan.  It is also a popular field decoration on Belouch prayer rugs. Today, the traditional Tree of Life design can be found blended with traditional Persian carpets such as Isfahans, Kirmans (Kermans), Qums, Semnans and Veramins.





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