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Kondoz : 11'5" x 9'

Kondoz : 11'5" x 9'

Kondoz : 11'5" x 9'
Kondoz : 11'5" x 9'
Kondoz : 11'5" x 9'

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NameKondoz
Size in feet 11'5" x 9'
Size in meters3.50 x 2.74
Pile (Fiber & Yarns Used)100% Hand-spun Himalayan Wool & Vegetable Dyes
Type of fabricationHand-knotted with Persian knots (Senneh)
Country Made InAfghanistan (South-Central Asia)
Design OriginZiegler
ConditionExcellent (Brand New)
Carpet IDSEK12902
CUSTOM SIZES AVAILABLE BY SPECIAL ORDER
PLEASE CONTACT US FOR AVAILABILITY
Sizes Are Approximate. Photos Are Representative And Not Necessarily Exact For Color
New Rugs Are Of The Highest Quality In Its Category And Are Handpicked Overseas By The Bashir Family

A Brief History of Ziegler Designs

Ziegler (Zeigler) is a term used to describe carpets produced by the late 19th century Anglo-Swiss firm: Ziegler & Company or it is a term used when describing carpets that are made with similar designs and color combinations used by the late firm. Rugs containing this design are sometimes known as Chobi rugs (which translates to wood in Farsi, a reference to their natural colour created by the vegetable dye) or Peshawar rugs (Peshawar is a city in Pakistan known for mass producing this type of design). Most new Ziegler designs are crafted in Afghanistan or in Pakistan by Afghan refugees and contain bold floral patterns. They are made with vegetable dyes and their knot count generally varies from 80 to 120 KPSI (Knots Per Square Inch). The carpets wool is of high quality: either hand-spun Ghazni wool or Himalayan wool making its structure very durable. Much like sodas tasting like Coca-cola being called Coke regardless of their brand, Ziegler design carpets are known as Ziegler even though they are not made by Ziegler & Co. Depending on whom you ask, they can sometimes be regarded as Sultanabad carpets because Ziegler & Co had workshops spread throughout the Sultanabad district of Iran.

In 1870 the supply of old rugs in Iran had been depleted and exports to the West had dwindled. Merchants of Tabriz carpets decided to produce new carpets expressly for export to Europe & North America. By 1875, they had established offices in Sultanabad, a small town in North West Iran (now known as Arak) with a rug large weaving tradition. In 1883, an Anglo-Swiss firm: Ph. Ziegler & Company joined them in weaving rugs for export to London and New York. The company was based in Manchester, England and established a carpet manufactory in Iran with the objective of producing Sultanabad style hand-knotted carpets to appeal more to western tastes. Ziegler manufactured carpets in north western Iran from 1883 to 1930 and was present at the birth of the carpet industry in Iran. It was to become important in shaping how rugs would be produced and what rugs would be woven in Sultanabad for the next 47 years. At the turn of the 20th century, Ziegler & Co. had about 2500 looms in more than one hundred villages around Sultanabad. For almost half-a-century of production, the company wove and imported thousands of rugs to Europe and America.







A Brief History of Afghan Carpets

Afghan carpets usually refer to rugs traditionally made in Afghanistan. However, many of these carpets today are also woven by Afghan refugees who reside in Pakistan and Iran. Between 1979 and 1992, around one million Afghans, including thousands of rug-weavers, fled Afghanistan during the Soviet Union occupation period. Afghan rugs are well-constructed, durable and made up of lovely designs. They reflect the heritage of cottage-based craftsmanship passed through generations. Carpets from Afghanistan can be divided into two categories: Turkmen carpets (also known as Turkoman) and Baluchi carpets. Most of these carpets have more in common with the tribal weavings of Central Asia in terms of color, design and weave than with their Persian counterparts. Contemporary Afghan weavers continue to create traditional rugs with designs passed down from generations passed. Their carpets are often woven on small portable looms and are mainly produced to adorn their personal homes. Most are made up of Persian knots and many feature vegetable-dyed hand-spun Afghan wool. Some weavers employ yarn that has been dyed naturally however it is common to use pre-dyed wool yarn, which is readily available in the local towns and villages. The pre-dyed wool can be used alone or in combination with naturally dyed yarn. Natural dyes are plant and vegetable based. Various qualities of pile carpets are available, ranging from coarse to medium in weave, including felted wool carpets (Namads), flat non-pile fabric woven carpets (Kilims), and pile and knotted carpets made from wool, silk, and cotton. The process of creating a hand knotted rug is laborious one that typically takes six to nine months to weave.





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